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The Show

Letters To Eve is a classic story of love, friendship, family, and honor.  This epic WWII musical follows a Japanese American family and their plight through forced internment, an African American jazz musician captured during Germany's occupation of France, and the powerful spirit of music and literature. This breathtaking new work will uncover the lost letters of history and paint a pure picture of a fascinating era.  Discover the power as these characters decide to stand up for what's right, and create a legacy for the ages!

TICKETS

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THE MILES MEMORIAL PLAYHOUSE

The Miles is a Santa Monica treasure. Located in Reed Park just 8 blocks from the Ocean and a few blocks from 3rd Street Promenade, the Historic Playhouse has entertained audiences since 1929. Along with recurring youth programs such as Downbeat 720  and the Santa Monica International Teen Film Festival. They offer world class entertainment every January & February at our intimate "Fireside at the Miles" performance series. The rest of the year we are available to local and regional non-profit performing arts companies and host a wide array of music, dance and theatrical events.

HISTORY

The Miles Memorial Playhouse was designed in 1929 by prominent local architect John Byers in the Spanish Colonial revival style. The building’s sponsor, J. Euclid Miles, was a leading citizen in the development of Santa Monica. In his last will and testament, Miles bequeathed $25,000 to the City to erect  a theater “for the children and young men and women” of Santa Monica as a memorial to his daughter, Mary A. Miles.

With its massive wooden beams, plasterwork, gleaming hardwood floors, ironwork details, and grand fireplace, the Playhouse has been enjoyed by generations of Santa Monicans and used almost continually since its inception as a meeting hall and performance venue.

In 1994 the Playhouse was nearly destroyed in the Northridge earthquake, but assisted by the John Ash group and in consultation with the community at large it was fully restored by the City in 1998. Since then it has presented annual cultural programs for youth and adults as well as ongoing public performances by renting nonprofits.

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Why Is It Important?

 
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1. We want to show the perseverance of the Japanese American citizens during WWII. Many musicals create archetypes of characters and don’t shed light on the human experience. We want to show these prisoners as friends, fathers, mothers, families, and follow those ‘relationships’, much less their ‘struggle’. Not taking their struggle lightly by any means, that is still a very important part the show, but the audience needs to see these people for who they were.  

2. A Black protagonist using music and hope to be a hero. Not enough shows have black protagonists, and of those shows not many of them carry on in an interracial love story. African Americans have such a rich history, if not the richest history when it comes to using music to handle horrific situations. We first find Archie breaking stone in a concentration camp, all the while trying to find a rhythm to the breaking of stone; trying to find some level of musicality to it. Gospel, Jazz, Blues, these are styles of music that demand one to grasp the deeper parts of one’s soul. So with Archie in the picture, the music, the dynamic, the characters are all effected in palpable ways.


3. Sexual Violence against Jewish Women During The Holocaust. Also the title of a great book written by: Sonja M Hedgepeth and Rochelle G Saidel, these atrocities are never expressed in a theatrical forum. In fact, most artistic accounts of the Holocaust don’t shed enough light on these situations. When it comes to war and rape, our society has somehow found a way to lessen its cultural impact. I wanted to use parts of this show to create a dialogue on this subject. Many shows lose their audiences with some sort of message, a broken fourth wall followed by awkward, almost rudimental dialogue with the sole purpose being the author to make sure we ‘understand’. We want the audience to be given clues to such sexual violence taking place, giving them the opportunity to think for themselves; maybe go home and research the matter. Any show that opens a dialogue and gets the audience thinking is a show that can change the world.

4. Germans during WWII as humans, not just Nazis. Partially motivated by the short story, “The Sunflower”, written by Simon Wiesenthal, I wanted to have a Nazi Officer, much against the Third Reich, more interested in Archie Kyle’s musical talents and much less his race, religion, or class. This plot line has always been a favorite of mine, flipping an expected archetype; a technique great for forcing the audience to think. Dierk, the Nazi Officer in Letters To Eve, develops an endearing relationship with Archie and their relationship highlights our capacity to love no matter the circumstance or popular course of action.

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5. The importance of writing; writing your story. This was one of the first themes of the show. Ray, our main protagonist (from the internment camps) has a special bond with his father. They share stories and Ray’s father presses the importance of writing one's story and living life with the memory in mind. I believe everyone can be a writer and if we put pen to paper we can make a difference. If it's sending a love letter to someone or finishing an autobiography, writing can cement one’s history.

6. Music as a tool to help one deal with horrific situations.

7. Music, rhythm, and poetry as a form of communication that binds all race, religion, country, class, and gender together.

8. Education. These pieces of history are too often left out of the classroom.  For those rare classrooms that do provide minimal curriculum, it is too often half a page worth of history. We need to educate all ages on the comfort in fear and how it is used to manipulate perspectives.  We are developing a workshop series to more easily reach out to younger ages.

CAST AND CREW

Daniel Sugimoto - Writer. Co-Director

Daniel Sugimoto - Writer. Co-Director

Julia Lisa - Co-Director. Production design. 

Julia Lisa - Co-Director. Production design. 

Melvin Biteng - Ray

Melvin Biteng - Ray

Andrea Somera - Eve

Andrea Somera - Eve

Scott Takeda - Maki

Scott Takeda - Maki

John F. Thomas - Archie Kyle

John F. Thomas - Archie Kyle

Cassandra Noel - Eden

Cassandra Noel - Eden

Jason Chacon - Dierk

Jason Chacon - Dierk

Justin Yu - Ken

Justin Yu - Ken

Max Lichtig - Volker

Max Lichtig - Volker

Erik Blair - Dr. Ottokar

Erik Blair - Dr. Ottokar

April Lam - Chinatsu

April Lam - Chinatsu

Abigail Somera - Ensemble

Abigail Somera - Ensemble

Austin Schumacher - Design. Ensemble

Austin Schumacher - Design. Ensemble

On Shiu - Akane

On Shiu - Akane

Mark Labella - Shuichi

Mark Labella - Shuichi

Julia Lanctot - Ensemble. Dramaturg 

Julia Lanctot - Ensemble. Dramaturg 

Michael Thomas-Visgar - Lt. Craft

Michael Thomas-Visgar - Lt. Craft

Emi Kamemoto - Ensemle. Dramaturg

Emi Kamemoto - Ensemle. Dramaturg

Genie Nakano - Bachan

Genie Nakano - Bachan

Gardena Valley Japanese Culrutal Institute

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The Gardena Valley Japanese Cultural Institute (GVJCI) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit community center housing various classes, services, and programs for seniors, non-senior adults, and youth in the South Bay for over 40 years.  Our mission is to serve the needs of the local Japanese American community through educational, cultural, and social programs that share the Japanese and Japanese American cultural heritage.

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Letters To Eve was excited to perform it's world premiere workshop event with The Gardena Valley Japanese Cultural Institute!  Saturday, September, 17th, during a one night only cultural event dedicated to families affected by President Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066; an order that sent hundreds of thousands of Japanese American citizens into relocation camps. It was a night filled with special musical selections from 'Letters To Eve' and true life accounts written by members of the community. 

During Letters To Eve's workshop at the Gardena Valley Japanese Cultural Institute, a WWII vet was inspired by the night and got up to sing his very own fight song dedicated to the 442nd.